1. slightlyamusing:

ololinda:

-coolbluereason-:

nikkigates:

livefastdieprettyxo:

glazemyloveplease:(via youmesexnow)
     
  2. slightlyamusing:

(via fuckyeahappycat)
     
  3. kyn:

rassilon:

kyn:

fantasticamazing:

kyn:

rassilon:

lavenderlines:

rakalak:

zuky:

sheresists:

adailyriot:

timekiller-s:

dihard:

“Things that are made from organic material age and decay, especially when they stop being alive. A piece of home-baked bread, say, left on your kitchen counter, will get moldy relatively fast. Lord knows what some ground beef would smell like after a week. But the artist Sally Davies has been photographing one McDonald’s hamburger and fries every day for 137 days. They look basically exactly the same.” via GOOD

Go read this:
http://velvetparkmedia.com/blogs/not-so-happy-meals
In which Nonna Joann of babybites.info kept a Happy Meal around for a whole year. That blog is here: http://www.babybites.info/2009/03/03/happy-meal-blog/
And here’s what Nonna’s Happy Meal looked like after 365 days: http://www.babybites.info/2010/03/03/1-year-happy-meal/
Sorry I don’t feel like opening the HTML window.


I would never feed this to a child.

Well, if you would never feed this to a child, it’s probably because you’ve never been put in a position where it was your best option.
Frankly the persistent and seemingly random gross-out tactics of many dietary regimen crusaders strike me as really peculiar and a little provincial. I mean, Chinese culture has spent thousands of years developing food preservation techniques to make food last without refrigeration, but apparently now some people think that’s gross. It’s a good thing 19th century Chinese railroad workers in the US and Canada didn’t abide by a “Happy Meal Project” test when they were eating the dried minced fish, pickled vegetables, salted eggs, fermented bean curd, and dried tea leaves which could take years to make it from farm to table, because then they would have been eating what their white counterparts were eating which often made people ill. Even now I have many Chinese ingredients in my pantry — many of them medicinal — which will easily last a year without visible changes.
Not that I’m a proponent of fast food. Personally I have very healthy eating habits. I grow my own vegetables and cook fresh food every day. But I also have zero problem with folks who like a Big Mac with fries and a shake now and then, or with folks who determine that a fast or frozen meal is their most economically viable option. Life is complicated and absolutism usually doesn’t work out well. Sometimes you gotta bend in order not to break.

The bolding in zuky’s excellent response is mine.

    kyn:

    rassilon:

    kyn:

    fantasticamazing:

    kyn:

    rassilon:

    lavenderlines:

    rakalak:

    zuky:

    sheresists:

    adailyriot:

    timekiller-s:

    dihard:

    “Things that are made from organic material age and decay, especially when they stop being alive. A piece of home-baked bread, say, left on your kitchen counter, will get moldy relatively fast. Lord knows what some ground beef would smell like after a week. But the artist Sally Davies has been photographing one McDonald’s hamburger and fries every day for 137 days. They look basically exactly the same.” via GOOD

    Go read this:

    http://velvetparkmedia.com/blogs/not-so-happy-meals

    In which Nonna Joann of babybites.info kept a Happy Meal around for a whole year. That blog is here: http://www.babybites.info/2009/03/03/happy-meal-blog/

    And here’s what Nonna’s Happy Meal looked like after 365 days: http://www.babybites.info/2010/03/03/1-year-happy-meal/

    Sorry I don’t feel like opening the HTML window.

    I would never feed this to a child.

    Well, if you would never feed this to a child, it’s probably because you’ve never been put in a position where it was your best option.

    Frankly the persistent and seemingly random gross-out tactics of many dietary regimen crusaders strike me as really peculiar and a little provincial. I mean, Chinese culture has spent thousands of years developing food preservation techniques to make food last without refrigeration, but apparently now some people think that’s gross. It’s a good thing 19th century Chinese railroad workers in the US and Canada didn’t abide by a “Happy Meal Project” test when they were eating the dried minced fish, pickled vegetables, salted eggs, fermented bean curd, and dried tea leaves which could take years to make it from farm to table, because then they would have been eating what their white counterparts were eating which often made people ill. Even now I have many Chinese ingredients in my pantry — many of them medicinal — which will easily last a year without visible changes.

    Not that I’m a proponent of fast food. Personally I have very healthy eating habits. I grow my own vegetables and cook fresh food every day. But I also have zero problem with folks who like a Big Mac with fries and a shake now and then, or with folks who determine that a fast or frozen meal is their most economically viable option. Life is complicated and absolutism usually doesn’t work out well. Sometimes you gotta bend in order not to break.

    The bolding in zuky’s excellent response is mine.

     
  4. (via xhalfpastdope)
     
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  10. disturbingimages:

paganlovefest:

via unomoralez